Admiralty Head Lighthouse

Admiralty Head Lighthouse

Located at Fort Casey State Park near Coupeville on Whidbey Island.
West Point Lighthouse

West Point Lighthouse

Just 20 minutes from downtown Seattle, this lighthouse is part of popular Discovery Park.
Turn Point Lighthouse

Turn Point Lighthouse

Part of the San Juan Islands National Monument, this Stuart Island lighthouse is where scientists study migrating orcas.
Point No Point Lighthouse

Point No Point Lighthouse

The oldest lighthouse on the Puget Sound, this Kitsap Peninsula beacon has been in operation since 1879.
Patos Island Lighthouse

Patos Island Lighthouse

For early ship captains sailing the San Juan Islands, the light flashed red. Now it flashes white. (photo by Linda Hudson)
North Head Lighthouse

North Head Lighthouse

This Ilwaco lighthouse kept ships from meeting their demise in the "Graveyard of the Pacific."
New Dungeness Lighthouse

New Dungeness Lighthouse

Getting to this lighthouse near Sequim is half the fun. Walk or kayak six miles in a National Wildlife Refuge. (photo by Chad Kaiser)
Grays Harbor Lighthouse

Grays Harbor Lighthouse

At 107 feet high, this Westport lighthouse is the tallest lighthouse in Washington.
Cape Disappointment Lighthouse

Cape Disappointment Lighthouse

Built to help seagoing vessels avoid becoming a victim of the Graveyard of the Pacific.
Mukilteo Lighthouse

Mukilteo Lighthouse

Standing tall next to the ferry terminal, Mukilteo Lighthouse gets its own festival every year.
Point Robinson Lighthouse

Point Robinson Lighthouse

This Maury Island lighthouse was featured in a children's Christmas story by Berkeley Breathed called The Red Ranger Came Calling.
Point No Point Lighthouse

Point No Point Lighthouse

The oldest lighthouse on the Puget Sound, Point No Point has been in continuous operation on the Kitsap Peninsula since 1879.

Why lighthouses matter – the story of Admiralty Head

While advanced technology is now at the core of modern ship navigation, our 19th-century lighthouses still play a vital role in guiding ships along Washington’s coastline. And they remain important symbols of the state’s maritime heritage.

Lighthouses draw thousands of visitors, history buffs, storytellers and artists every year. That’s why they are worth preserving for generations to come.

Hundreds of enthusiasts and community volunteers give generously of their time and money to preserve, protect and sustain our coastal treasures. We know not everyone can do that. However…

there is one simple thing you can do to help keep Washington lighthouses shining

Purchase a Washington Lighthouse License Plate

Proceeds from the sales of license plates fund restoration projects, community education efforts and volunteer training, all under the umbrella of Lighthouse Environmental Programs.

Pt.Wilson

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Yes No No No No Yes

First lit in 1879, then rebuilt in 1913, Point Wilson Lighthouse at 51 feet high is the tallest beacon on Puget Sound. Marking the entrance to Admiralty Inlet and the turning point into the San Juan Islands, this lighthouse stands at Fort Worden State Park near the Victorian village of Port Townsend on the Olympic Peninsula.

The light shines from a 4th order Fresnel lens, beaming a white light on for 15 seconds, then off 5 seconds, with one red flash during the occultation. The light was automated in 1976, and is monitored by a computer located at the Coast Guard Air Station at nearby Port Angeles.

Point Wilson Lighthouse is open for tours on Saturdays in May through September from 1:00 to 4:00, and for special tours on request.

Map and Directions